What is Mindfulness? – Mindful

Video Mindfulness what is it

full attention. It’s a pretty simple word. it suggests that the mind is fully attending to what is happening, to what you are doing, to the space you are moving through. that may seem trivial, except for the annoying fact that we so often get sidetracked from the matter at hand. our minds fly away, we lose touch with our bodies, and very soon we are engrossed in obsessive thoughts about something that has just happened or worrying about the future. and that makes us anxious.

mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.

however, no matter how far we go, mindfulness is there to take us back to where we are and what we are doing and feeling. If you want to know what mindfulness is, it is best to try it for a while. Since it’s hard to pin down in words, you’ll find slight variations in meaning in books, websites, audio, and video.

mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.

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mindfulness is a quality that every human being already possesses, it is not something you have to conjure up, you just have to learn to access it.

the types of mindfulness practice

While mindfulness is innate, it can be cultivated through proven techniques. here are some examples:

  1. sitting, walking, standing and moving meditation (lying down is also possible, but often leads to sleep);
  2. brief pauses that we insert into everyday life;
  3. merge the practice of meditation with other activities, such as yoga or sports.
  4. the benefits of mindfulness practice:

    When we meditate, it doesn’t help to focus on the benefits, but simply to do the practice and yet there are benefits or no one would do it.

    When we are mindful, we reduce stress, improve performance, gain knowledge and awareness through observing our own minds, and increase our attention to the well-being of others.

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    Mindfulness meditation provides us with a time in our lives when we can suspend judgment and unleash our natural curiosity about the workings of the mind, approaching our experience with warmth and kindness, with ourselves and with others. the others.

    8 facts about mindfulness:

    1. Mindfulness is not obscure or exotic. It is familiar to us because it is what we already do, how we already are. it takes many forms and has many names.
    2. Mindfulness is not something special added that we do. We already have the ability to be present and it does not require us to change who we are. but we can cultivate these innate qualities with simple practices that are scientifically proven to benefit ourselves, our loved ones, our friends and neighbors, the people we work with, and the institutions and organizations in which we participate
    3. You don’t need to change. Solutions that ask us to change who we are or become something we’re not have failed us time and time again. mindfulness recognizes and cultivates the best of who we are as human beings.
    4. mindfulness has the potential to become a transformative social phenomenon. Here’s why:
    5. anyone can do it. Mindfulness practice cultivates universal human qualities and does not require anyone to change their beliefs. everyone can benefit and it’s easy to learn.
    6. is a way of life. mindfulness is more than just a practice. It brings awareness and care to everything we do, and reduces unnecessary stress. even a little improves our lives.
    7. is based on evidence. We don’t have to take mindfulness in faith. Both science and experience demonstrate its positive benefits for our health, happiness, work, and relationships.
    8. generates innovation. As we grapple with the increasing complexity and uncertainty of our world, mindfulness can lead us to effective, resilient, low-cost responses to seemingly intractable problems.
    9. mindfulness is not just in your head

      When we think of mindfulness and meditation (with a capital m), we can become obsessed with thinking about our thoughts: let’s do something with what’s going on in our heads. it’s as if these bodies we have are just inconvenient sacks for our brains to carry around.

      however, having it all in your head lacks the feeling of the old seriousness.

      Meditation begins and ends in the body. It involves taking the time to pay attention to where we are and what’s going on, and that starts with being aware of our bodies

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      that approach can make it appear to float, like we don’t have to walk. we can just float.

      but meditation begins and ends in the body. It involves taking the time to pay attention to where we are and what’s going on, and that starts with being aware of our bodies. that very act can be calming, since our body has internal rhythms that help it to relax if we give it the opportunity.

      how to sit for meditation

      here is a posture practice that can be used as the beginning stage of a meditation practice period or simply as something to do for a minute, perhaps to settle down and find a moment of relaxation before returning to the fight. if you have injuries or other physical difficulties, you can modify this to suit your situation.

      1. Sit down. Whatever you’re sitting on (a chair, a meditation cushion, a park bench), find a place that provides a stable, solid seat, without sitting or lagging.
      2. Watch what your legs do. If you’re on a cushion on the floor, cross your legs comfortably in front of you. (if you already do some kind of seated yoga posture, go ahead). if you’re in a chair, it’s good if the soles of your feet touch the ground.
      3. straighten, but don’t stiffen, your upper body. your spine has a natural curve. let it be there. your head and shoulders can rest comfortably on your vertebrae.
      4. Place your upper arms parallel to your upper body. Then drop your hands onto your upper legs. With your upper arms at your sides, your hands will land in the right place. too far forward will make you slouch. too far back will make you stiff. you are tuning the strings of your body, not too tight and not too loose.
      5. Put your chin down a bit and let your gaze fall gently downward. You can let your eyelids lower. if you feel the need, you can lower them completely, but it is not necessary to close your eyes when meditating. you can simply let what appears before your eyes be there without focusing on it.
      6. stay there for a few moments. relax. Now get up and go about your day. And if practicing mindfulness by paying attention to your breath or the sensations in your body is next on the agenda, you’ve started with your right foot, hands, arms, and everything in between.
      7. start over. when you have established your posture, feel your breath, or some say “follow” it, as it comes in and out. (Some versions of the practice put more emphasis on the out-breath, and for the in-breath simply leave a spacious pause.) Inevitably, your attention will leave the breath and wander elsewhere. When you realize this, in a few seconds, a minute, five minutes, bring your attention back to your breath. don’t bother judging yourself or obsessing over the content of the thoughts. to return. you leave, you come back.
      8. that’s it. that’s the practice. It has often been said that it is very simple, but not necessarily easy. the job is to keep doing it. the results will be accumulated.
      9. try this mindfulness meditation for beginners:

        a 5 minute breathing meditation to cultivate mindfulness. This practice is designed to reduce stress, anxiety, and negative emotions, cool down when your temper flares, and sharpen your concentration skills.

        learn more about mindfulness:

        Explore the science of mindfulness, learn how to meditate and practice mindful movement, and dispel some of the myths of mindfulness with the Introduction Guide to Mindfulness

Content Creator Zaid Butt joined Silsala-e-Azeemia in 2004 as student of spirituality. Mr. Zahid Butt is an IT professional, his expertise include “Web/Graphic Designer, GUI, Visualizer and Web Developer” PH: +92-3217244554

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