Arteriosclerosis / atherosclerosis – Symptoms and causes – Mayo Clinic

Video Atherosclerosis what is it

summary

arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis are sometimes used to mean the same thing, but there is a difference between the two terms.

atherosclerosis occurs when the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients from the heart to the rest of the body (arteries) become thick and stiff, sometimes restricting blood flow to organs and fabrics. healthy arteries are flexible and elastic. But over time, the walls of the arteries can harden, a condition commonly called hardening of the arteries.

atherosclerosis is a specific type of arteriosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in and on the walls of the arteries. this buildup is called plaque. plaque can cause arteries to narrow, blocking blood flow. plaque can also burst and cause a blood clot.

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Although atherosclerosis is often thought of as a heart problem, it can affect arteries anywhere in the body. atherosclerosis can be treated. healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent atherosclerosis.

symptoms

Mild atherosclerosis usually has no symptoms.

Symptoms of atherosclerosis usually don’t occur until an artery is so narrow or clogged that it can’t supply enough blood to organs and tissues. sometimes a blood clot completely blocks blood flow. the clot can break off and trigger a heart attack or stroke.

The symptoms of moderate to severe atherosclerosis depend on the affected arteries. for example:

  • if you have atherosclerosis in the arteries of your heart, you may have chest pain or pressure (angina).
  • if you have atherosclerosis in the arteries leading to the brain, you may have sudden numbness or weakness in your arms or legs, slurred or slurred speech, temporary loss of vision in one eye or sagging muscles in the face. These signal a transient ischemic attack (TIA). without treatment, a tia can lead to a stroke.
  • if you have atherosclerosis in the arteries of your arms and legs, you may have symptoms of peripheral arterial disease, such as leg pain when walking (claudication) or low blood pressure in an extremity affected.
  • If you have atherosclerosis in the arteries leading to your kidneys, you may develop high blood pressure or kidney failure.
  • when to see a doctor

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    If you think you have atherosclerosis, talk to your health care provider. Also watch for early symptoms caused by lack of blood flow, such as chest pain (angina), leg pain, or numbness.

    Early diagnosis and treatment can keep atherosclerosis from getting worse and prevent a heart attack, stroke, or other medical emergency.

    causes

    Atherosclerosis is a slowly worsening disease that can begin in childhood. the exact cause is unknown. it can start with damage or injury to the inner layer of an artery. damage can be caused by:

    • high blood pressure
    • high cholesterol
    • high triglycerides, a type of fat (lipid) in the blood
    • smoking or chewing tobacco
    • diabetes
    • insulin resistance
    • obesity
    • inflammation of unknown cause or diseases such as arthritis, lupus, psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease
    • Once the inner wall of an artery is damaged, blood cells and other substances can collect at the site of the injury and collect on the inner lining of the artery.

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      Over time, fats, cholesterols, and other substances also build up on the inner walls of the heart’s arteries. this buildup is called plaque. plaque can cause arteries to narrow, blocking blood flow. plaque can also burst and cause a blood clot.

      risk factors

      Hardening of the arteries occurs over time. aging is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. other things that can increase the risk of atherosclerosis include:

      • family history of early heart disease
      • an unhealthy diet
      • diabetes
      • high blood pressure
      • high cholesterol
      • elevated levels of c-reactive protein (crp), a marker of inflammation
      • lack of exercise
      • obesity
      • sleep apnea
      • smoking and other uses of tobacco
      • complications

        The complications of atherosclerosis depend on which arteries are narrowed or blocked. for example:

        • coronary artery disease. When atherosclerosis narrows the arteries near the heart, you can develop coronary artery disease, which can cause chest pain (angina), a heart attack or heart failure.
        • Carotid artery disease. When atherosclerosis narrows the arteries near the brain, you may develop carotid artery disease. this can cause a transient ischemic attack (tia) or stroke.
        • Peripheral arterial disease. When atherosclerosis narrows the arteries in your arms or legs, you may develop blood flow problems in your arms and legs, known as peripheral arterial disease . this can make you less sensitive to heat and cold, increasing the risk of burns or frostbite. Rarely, lack of blood flow to the arms or legs can cause tissue death (gangrene).
        • aneurysms. Atherosclerosis can also cause aneurysms, a serious complication that can occur anywhere in the body. Most people with aneurysms have no symptoms. Pain and throbbing can occur in the area of ​​an aneurysm and is a medical emergency. if an aneurysm bursts, it can cause life-threatening bleeding inside the body.
        • chronic kidney disease. atherosclerosis can cause the arteries leading to the kidneys to narrow. the narrowing of these arteries prevents enough oxygen-rich blood from reaching the kidneys. the kidneys need enough blood flow to help filter waste products and get rid of extra fluids.
        • prevention

          The same healthy lifestyle changes recommended to treat atherosclerosis also help prevent it. These lifestyle changes can help keep your arteries healthy:

          • quit smoking
          • eat healthy food
          • exercise regularly
          • maintain a healthy weight
          • control and maintain healthy blood pressure
          • control and maintain healthy cholesterol and blood sugar levels
Content Creator Zaid Butt joined Silsala-e-Azeemia in 2004 as student of spirituality. Mr. Zahid Butt is an IT professional, his expertise include “Web/Graphic Designer, GUI, Visualizer and Web Developer” PH: +92-3217244554

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